Tuesday, September 18, 2018

LIFE

This Is Victor: Woman Helps Homeless Man Build New Life

For three years everyday, Ginger Sprouse and other residents of Kemah, Texas, would drive past Victor Hubbard, rain or shine. Victor Hubbard did not...

Single Mom Faces Eviction, Then Her 9-Year-Old Daughter Finds Amazing Way...

Young mom, Natalie Koltes was quickly approaching eviction from her Las Vegas home. She was struggling to meet ends meet while trying to pay...
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MORE ARTICLES

Puerto Rico has not recovered from Hurricane Maria

Puerto Rico was in crisis long before Hurricane Maria hit on Sept. 20, 2017. For years, this U.S. territory had been struggling with debt, economic crisis and drought. In May 2017, the government defaulted on...

Barriers for transgender voters ahead of the 2018 midterm elections

Recently, there have been a number of historic firsts for transgender political candidates. In 2017, State Rep. Danica Roem of Virginia became the first openly transgender person to be elected to a state legislature, and...

The migration of same-sex couples to the suburbs is shaping the fight for LGBT...

This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in the most important case involving same-sex marriage since it became legal in all 50 states. On its surface, the Masterpiece Cakeshop case looked like it...

5 math skills your child needs to get ready for kindergarten

Parents play a critical role in their children’s early math education. They not only can provide math-related toys and games, but serve as role models demonstrating how math is used in everyday activities. Children who...

Is apple cider vinegar good for you? A doctor weighs in

When my brother and I were kids back in the ‘80s, we loved going to Long John Silver’s. But it wasn’t just for the fish. It was for the vinegar – malt vinegar. We would uncap...

Trump should wage a war on waste instead of battling the world over trade

President Donald Trump is fighting the wrong fight in his ongoing trade war with the rest of the world. That’s because it’s premised on the old-school notion of the linear economy in which someone in...

Trump should wage a war on waste instead of battling the world over trade

President Donald Trump is fighting the wrong fight in his ongoing trade war with the rest of the world. That’s because it’s premised on the old-school notion of the linear economy in which someone in...

Sending help where it’s needed most after disasters

After costly and deadly disasters, large deliveries of supplies – whether they are needed or not – arrive. So do throngs of people who want to pitch in. But while studying the responses to many...

In 1968, computers got personal: How the ‘mother of all demos’ changed the world

On a crisp California afternoon in early December 1968, a square-jawed, mild-mannered Stanford researcher named Douglas Engelbart took the stage at San Francisco’s Civic Auditorium and proceeded to blow everyone’s mind about what computers...

Yom Kippur: A time for feasting as well as fasting

It was the bag of Fritos that gave me away. As a secular Jewish kid whose family did not belong to a synagogue, I did not think twice about riding my bike to the...

Researchers block cocaine craving and addiction with a special skin graft

Addiction to any drug – be it alcohol, tobacco, opioids or illicit drugs, like cocaine – is a chronic disease that causes a compulsive drug-seeking behavior individuals find difficult or impossible to control even...

Cuba propone legalizar el matrimonio gay y las iglesias se atreven a salir en...

Desde mediados de agosto, los cubanos debaten una propuesta reforma constitucional que, entre otros cambios sustanciales, allanaría el camino para la legitimación del matrimonio gay. La nueva constitución también busca penalizar a quienes discriminen ya...

Are today’s white kids less racist than their grandparents?

In America’s children, we often see hope for a better future, especially when it comes to reducing racism. Each new generation of white people, the thinking goes, will naturally and inevitably be more open-minded and...

As Cuba backs gay marriage, churches oppose the government’s plan

Leer en español. Cubans are debating a constitutional reform that, among other legal changes, would open the door to gay marriage. It would also prohibit discrimination against people based on sex, gender, sexual orientation and...

Catastrophe overload? Read philosophers and poetry instead of headlines

For almost two years now, Americans have been confronted daily by ominous tidings. We are living through stressful times. Reading the news feels awful; ignoring it doesn’t feel right either. Psychologist Terri Apter recently wrote...

The science, skill – and luck – behind evacuation order calls

More than 1 million people in the Carolinas were ordered to evacuate days before Hurricane Florence hit landfall. Government officials order coastal evacuation even when it’s sunny at the beach with not a cloud in...

How the zebrafish got its stripes

Stripes are common in our lives. It’s a pretty basic pattern, and easy to take for granted. As an applied mathematician who studies how patterns form in nature, though, I am wowed by the striped...

Digitizing the vast ‘dark data’ in museum fossil collections

The great museums of the world harbor a secret: They’re home to millions upon millions of natural history specimens that almost never see the light of day. They lie hidden from public view, typically...

Federal funding for higher ed comes with strings attached, but is still worth it

When nonprofit colleges and universities get federal funding for research and to support students, do government regulations make it difficult to fulfill their missions? As a professor who studies the organizational performance of nonprofits and...

Rivers flood regularly during hurricanes, but get less attention than coastlines

Hurricane Florence, now a tropical depression, has dropped record-setting rainfall on parts of North Carolina. Many river gauges show waterways above flood stage. Flash and long-term flooding, as well as a risk of landslides,...

Barrier islands protect coasts from storms, but are vulnerable too

When hurricanes like Florence make landfall, the first things they hit often are barrier islands – thin ribbons of sand that line the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts. It’s hard to imagine how these...

Can Jeff Bezos help the homeless? 4 essential reads

Tonight, some 554,000 people in the U.S. will be homeless. Many of them live on the West Coast, where Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is launching a new fund that plans to fight the problem. Part...

Immigrant detention in the US: 4 essential reads

More children are being held in immigrant detention centers in the U.S. than ever previously recorded, according to The New York Times. The number of immigrant children in detention has risen to about 12,800, the...

Nuclear reactors in hurricanes: 5 questions answered

Hurricane Florence may affect the operations of several of the 16 nuclear reactors located in the Carolinas and Virginia, raising concerns about safety and power outages. Ted Kury, director of energy studies at the...

Delacroix at the Met: A retrospective that evokes today’s turmoil

I’m an art historian and professor who studies and teaches French Romantic art. So when I was in France this past summer, I made sure to see the Louvre’s retrospective exhibition of French Romantic...

Could coal ash be a viable source of rare-earth metals?

Rare-earth elements, including neodymium and yttrium, are not actually rare – more common, in fact, in the Earth’s crust than copper and tin. But, because they are scattered widely, and hard to separate from...

Ground-level ozone continues to damage health, even at low levels

Ground-level ozone is one of six major pollutants regulated nationally under the Clean Air Act. It is not directly emitted, but instead forms in the atmosphere through reactions between other pollutants from cars, power...

Battles over patriotism, Pledge of Allegiance in schools span a century

When a California school principal called controversial quarterback Colin Kaepernick an “anti-American thug” for his protests during the national anthem at NFL football games, passions were inflamed anew over whether patriotism should be taught...

Death count debates overshadow the real story: Hurricane Maria was partly a human-made disaster

Last September, President Donald Trump told Puerto Ricans they should be grateful Hurricane Maria had not caused a “real catastrophe like Katrina.” However, mounting evidence now reveals the death toll for Maria far surpasses initial...

Study shows BPA substitutes may cause same health issues as the original

The credibility of scientific findings hinges on their reproducibility. As a scientist, it is therefore disastrous when you are unable to replicate your own findings. Our laboratory has found itself in just this situation...

Why hurricane forecasters can’t ‘politicize’ storm warnings even if they wanted to

Dr. Marshall Shepherd of the University of Georgia famously talks about “climate zombie myths”: No matter how many times you slay them, they keep coming back. In 2016 conservative news blogger Matt Drudge accused the...

After a century, insulin is still expensive – could DIYers change that?

Soon after Federick Banting discovered that insulin could be used to treat diabetes in 1921, he sold the patent to the University of Toronto for about a dollar. Banting received the Nobel prize because...

For centuries, anonymous insider accounts have chipped away at ruling regimes – and sometimes...

Bob Woodward’s new book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” seems to contain scant new information. Like Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” it portrays President Donald Trump as an “emotionally...

For centuries, anonymous insider accounts have chipped away at ruling regimes – and sometimes...

Bob Woodward’s new book, “Fear: Trump in the White House,” seems to contain scant new information. Like Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” it portrays President Donald Trump as an “emotionally...

Lessons from White House disinformation a century ago: ‘It’s dangerous to believe your own...

One hundred years ago, the U.S. government published documents that fueled the mounting Red Scare, helped justify the American military invasion of Russia and poisoned American-Russian relations for years to come. Newspapers across the United...

Magnetic bacteria and their unique superpower attract researchers

As a graduate student in the 1970s, microbiologist Richard Blakemore probably wasn’t expecting to discover a new bacterial species with a never-before-seen ability. While studying bacteria that live in muddy swamps, he observed that...

Why we love robotic dogs, puppets and dolls

There’s a lot of hype around the release of Sony’s latest robotic dog. It’s called “aibo,” and is promoted as using artificial intelligence to respond to people looking at it, talking to it and...

Want to help after hurricanes? Give cash, not diapers

Some companies and community groups didn’t wait for Hurricane Florence to make landfall before organizing donation drives. But as a researcher with the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, an interdisciplinary center at Harvard University dedicated to relieving...

How social networks can save lives when disasters strike

Soon after my family moved to New Orleans in the summer of 2005, we heard Mayor Ray Nagin’s first warnings about Hurricane Katrina. With two young children, a job I hadn’t started yet, and...

Hurricanes can cause enormous damage inland, but emergency plans focus on coasts

As Hurricane Florence approaches the U.S. coast, over a million people have been ordered to evacuate from barrier islands and low-lying areas from South Carolina to Virginia. Precautions like this have been part of...

Why the Russians might hack the Boy Scouts next

In the two years since Russia made headlines for targeting an American political organization – the Democratic National Committee – and undermining Hillary Clinton’s race for the presidency, Russian information warfare tactics have come...

India’s sodomy ban, now ruled illegal, was a British colonial legacy

The Indian Supreme Court has legalized homosexuality, overturning a 157-year ban on consensual gay sex. In a nearly 500-page unanimous decision issued on Sept. 6, India’s highest court affirmed that “whenever the constitutional courts come...

What is flood insurance and why the system is broken: 6 questions answered

Editor’s note: Homeowners generally rely on insurance provided by the federal government to cover the costs of rebuilding their lives after a flood. We asked an insurance expert to explain the government program and...

How Les Moonves got to leave CBS on his own terms while others in...

On Sept. 9, CBS Chairman Les Moonves resigned, following accusations by 12 women of harassment and assault. His departure, however, has not followed the script of other executives publicly shamed over harassment allegations and thrown...

New data paint an unpleasant picture of poverty in the US

On Sept. 12, the U.S. Census Bureau released national poverty data for 2017. The headline was that 39.7 million people were poor in 2017. This works out to 12.3 percent of the population or one...

Gene-editing technique CRISPR identifies dangerous breast cancer mutations

More than 1 million women have had genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2, genes in which mutations can dramatically increase the risk for early onset breast and ovarian cancer. But for many women the...

Savvy social media strategies boost anti-establishment political wins

Mexico’s anti-establishment presidential candidate, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, faced opposition from the mainstream media. And he spent 13 percent less on advertising than his opponents. Yet the man commonly known by his initials as...

What college rankings really measure – hint: It’s not quality or value

Each year various magazines and newspapers publish college rankings in an attempt to inform parents and prospective students which colleges are supposedly the best. U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” – perhaps the most...

What college rankings really measure – hint: It’s not quality or value

Each year various magazines and newspapers publish college rankings in an attempt to inform parents and prospective students which colleges are supposedly the best. U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” – perhaps the most...

Our shared reality is fraying

The concept of truth is under assault, but our troubles with truth aren’t exactly new. What’s different is that in the past, debates about the status of truth primarily took place in intellectual cafes and...