Friday, January 18, 2019

LIFE

This Is Victor: Woman Helps Homeless Man Build New Life

For three years everyday, Ginger Sprouse and other residents of Kemah, Texas, would drive past Victor Hubbard, rain or shine. Victor Hubbard did not...

Single Mom Faces Eviction, Then Her 9-Year-Old Daughter Finds Amazing Way...

Young mom, Natalie Koltes was quickly approaching eviction from her Las Vegas home. She was struggling to meet ends meet while trying to pay...
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MORE ARTICLES

Howard Thurman – the Baptist minister who had a deep influence on MLK

For most African-Americans who grew up with the legacy of segregation and violence, making space for introspection was difficult. Martin Luther King Jr., however, learned to integrate spiritual growth with social transformation – a...

A teen scientist helped me discover tons of golf balls polluting the ocean

Plastic pollution in the world’s oceans has become a global environmental crisis. Many people have seen images that seem to capture it, such as beaches carpeted with plastic trash or a seahorse gripping a...

America’s public schools seldom bring rich and poor together – and MLK would disapprove

Five decades after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., many carry on his legacy through the struggle for racially integrated schools. Yet as King put it in a 1968 speech, the deeper struggle...

Martin Luther King Jr., union man

If Martin Luther King Jr. still lived, he’d probably tell people to join unions. King understood racial equality was inextricably linked to economics. He asked, “What good does it do to be able to eat...

Data breaches are inevitable – here’s how to protect yourself anyway

It’s tempting to give up on data security altogether, with all the billions of pieces of personal data – Social Security numbers, credit cards, home addresses, phone numbers, passwords and much more – breached...

Can genetic engineering save disappearing forests?

Compared to gene-edited babies in China and ambitious projects to rescue woolly mammoths from extinction, biotech trees might sound pretty tame. But releasing genetically engineered trees into forests to counter threats to forest health represents...

What’s an index fund?

The creation of the index fund in 1975 revolutionized investing, lowering costs for millions of ordinary investors. Their inventor John Bogle died on Jan. 16 at the age of 89. Bogle took a complex universe of...

Food is medicine: How US policy is shifting toward nutrition for better health

In this new year, millions of Americans will make resolutions about healthier eating. In 2019, could U.S. government leaders further resolve to improve healthier eating as well, joining public health experts in seeing that...

How Central American migrants helped revive the US labor movement

In the United States’ heated national debate about immigration, two views predominate about Central American migrants: President Donald Trump portrays them as a national security threat, while others respond that they are refugees from...

Bison are back, and that benefits many other species on the Great Plains

Driving north of Pawhuska, Oklahoma, an extraordinary landscape comes into view. Trees disappear and an immense landscape of grass emerges, undulating in the wind like a great, green ocean. This is the Flint Hills. For...

What a 16th-century mystic can teach us about making good decisions

Decision-making is a complex process. As individuals, working through our daily lives, we often take a number of shortcuts that may not always serve us well. For example, we make impulsive decisions when stressed...

3 ways Trump could disrupt health care for the better

Since his winning presidential campaign, Donald Trump has been repeatedly billed as a disrupter. From trade and foreign policy to immigration, Trump has consistently tried to shake up the status quo. As experts in health...

Is winter miserable for wildlife?

While the weather outside may indeed get frightful this winter, a parka, knit hat, wool socks, insulated boots and maybe a roaring fire make things bearable for people who live in cold climates. But...

Razor burned: Why Gillette’s campaign against toxic masculinity missed the mark

Gillette has launched a new marketing campaign, “The Best Men Can Be,” with an ad that has gone viral. The ad begins by depicting boys bullying other boys, women being harassed and cat-called, and a...

Razor burned: Why Gillette’s campaign against toxic masculinity missed the mark

Gillette has launched a new marketing campaign, “The Best Men Can Be,” with an ad that has gone viral. The ad begins by depicting boys bullying other boys, women being harassed and cat-called, and a...

Trump’s interpreters for Putin meetings face ethical dilemma

President Donald Trump met several times with Russian President Vladimir Putin while no other American was privy to the communication except for a State Department interpreter. In July 2018, Democratic members of the House Intelligence...

A new way to curb nitrogen pollution: Regulate fertilizer producers, not just farmers

Nitrogen pollution is produced by a number of interlinked compounds, from ammonia to nitrous oxide. While they have both natural and human sources, the latter increased dramatically over the past century as farmers scaled...

Want better tips? Go for gold

Although tipping is generally thought to be a voluntary payment meant to express gratitude to a service worker, the history of tipping suggests that it originated as a way for people to flaunt their...

The biggest nonprofit media outlets are thriving but smaller ones may not survive

Richard Tofel, ProPublica’s president and founding general manager, likes to say the U.S. nonprofit news site was “born on third base.” Indeed, when the Pulitzer-winning outlet launched in 2008, ProPublica had US$10 million in...

In ‘airports of the future,’ everything new is old again

As massive new airports open across Asia and the Middle East, U.S. airports are enhancing security checkpoints with technological gadgets to screen passengers and luggage more quickly. All these projects are often touted as...

El Chapo trial shows why a wall won’t stop drugs from crossing the US-Mexico...

The trial of Mexican drug kingpin Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera has exposed just how powerful Mexico’s cartels really are. The trial has now run for two months. On Jan. 15, a Colombian drug trafficker...

Brexit: An ‘escape room’ with no escape

Brexit is beginning to look a lot like an “escape room” with no exit. An escape room is an increasingly popular adventure game that requires participants to solve a series of puzzles before they can...

States are on the front lines of fighting inequality

When Democrats regained control of the U.S. House of Representatives, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., almost immediately took aim at America’s growing income inequality by recommending a 70 percent tax rate on income over US$10 million. Income...

Garbage collection in Syria is crucial to fighting the Islamic State

Just a few years ago, I was a diplomat working on the Turkish-Syrian border. My job was managing the U.S. government team responsible for delivering aid to Syrian towns and cities loyal to the...

Leaders always ‘manufacture’ crises, in politics and business

“This is a humanitarian crisis, a crisis of the heart and a crisis of the soul.” That’s how President Donald Trump framed his demand for funds to build a “border wall” and end the partial...

Trump’s reference to Wounded Knee evokes the dark history of suppression of indigenous religions

President Trump evoked the Wounded Knee massacre in a recent tweet. He was reacting to an Instagram video that Sen. Elizabeth Warren posted on New Year’s Eve. There’s been considerable criticism of the president’s inaccurate...

New debit card for federal student loan borrowers could save money, but concerns linger

The U.S. Department of Education is about to pilot test a new debit card for students who get federal student loans. For the federal government, it means less hassle and a way to get a...

Ulterior motives may lurk behind new debit card for federal student loan borrowers

The U.S. Department of Education is about to pilot test a new debit card for students who get federal student loans. For the federal government, it means less hassle and a way to get a...

Why victims of Catholic priests need to hear more than confessions

Pope Francis has criticized U.S. Catholic bishops for how they handled the pervasive sexual abuse of children by predatory priests. He even called for a new management method and mindset in dealing with this...

Many painful returns: Coping with crummy gifts

What happens to the gifts you get? I’m not talking about the ones that you really adore. I mean the rest of them – the ones you can’t or don’t want to use, or...

Toward a circular economy: Tackling the plastics recycling problem

Why has the world continued to increase consumption of plastic materials when at the same time, environmental and human health concerns over their use have grown? One answer is they are immensely useful to humankind,...

Offices are too hot or too cold – is there a better way to...

In any office, home or other shared space, there’s almost always someone who’s too cold, someone who’s too hot – and someone who doesn’t know what the fuss around the thermostat is all about. Most...

Guatemala in crisis after president bans corruption investigation into his government

For months, Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales has been trying to stop a United Nations-backed anti-corruption investigation into his government. Morales, a stand-up comedian whose ran for president in 2015 with the slogan “Not corrupt, nor...

The shutdown will harm the health and safety of Americans, even after it’s long...

With the U.S. federal government shutdown now the longest in history, it’s important to understand what a shutdown means for the health and safety of Americans. The good news is that in the short run,...

To preserve US national parks in a warming world, reconnect fragmented public lands

The Trump administration’s decision to keep many U.S. national parks open during the current federal government shutdown, with few or no staff, spotlights how popular and how vulnerable these unique places are. Some states, such...

Why do Muslim women wear a ‘hijab’?

Nazma Khan, who immigrated to the United States from Bangladesh at age 11, faced years of shaming over wearing a headscarf in New York. So, in 2013, she started World Hijab Day – a day...

How to train the body’s own cells to combat antibiotic resistance

Drug-resistant superbugs have threatened human health for decades. The situation is getting worse because of the shortage of new antibiotics. But what if we changed the way we aim to treat them, and trained...

Why privatizing the VA or other essential health services is a bad idea

The Trump administration wants to shift billions of dollars from government-run veterans’ hospitals to private health care providers. That’s true even though earlier this year the administration vehemently denied it would privatize any part...

The Prohibition-era origins of the modern craft cocktail movement

With America in the middle of a flourishing craft beer and craft spirits movement, it’s easy to forget that Prohibition was once the law of the land. One hundred years ago, on Jan. 16, 1919,...

3 reasons to pay attention to the LA teacher strike

The first mass teacher labor action of 2019 is unfolding in California as the United Teachers Los Angeles walked out for the first time in 30 years. This strike, which began on Jan. 14, isn’t...

Memories of eating influence your next meal – new research pinpoints brain cells involved

Of course you know that eating is vital to your survival, but have you ever thought about how your brain controls how much you eat, when you eat and what you eat? This is not...

The 2019 government shutdown is just the latest reason why poor people can’t bank...

I conduct a lot of in-depth interviews with people like a woman I’ll call Angie as part of my work as a political scientist who studies poverty and public policy. When I asked the...

The 2019 government shutdown is just the latest reason why poor people can’t bank...

I conduct a lot of in-depth interviews with people like a woman I’ll call Angie as part of my work as a political scientist who studies poverty and public policy. When I asked the...

Change your phone settings so Apple, Google can’t track your movements

Technology companies have been pummeled by revelations about how poorly they protect their customers’ personal information, including an in-depth New York Times report detailing the ability of smartphone apps to track users’ locations. Some...

Chicago, New York discounted most public input in expanding bike systems

When New York and Chicago decided to expand their public bike share systems a few years back, city officials wanted to go about it democratically. Using community meetings, workshops and interactive maps, they asked...

How one German city developed – and then lost – generations of math geniuses

There are two things that connect the names Gauss, Riemann, Hilbert and Noether. One is their outstanding breadth of contributions to the field of mathematics. The other is that each was a professor at...

Acute flaccid myelitis: What is the polio-like illness paralyzing US children?

I experienced déjà vu when I took care of a child with acute flaccid myelitis in 2014, one of the first cases of its kind at the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles in many years. I...

Who are the federal workers affected by the shutdown? 5 questions answered

The current government shutdown is now the longest in American history, affecting about 800,000 federal employees out of 1.8 million full-time civil servants, not counting military personnel and postal workers. Of those, about 380,000 have...

If Trump declares a national emergency, could Congress or the courts reverse it?

If President Donald Trump declares a national emergency to fund some portion of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border without congressional authorization, what would happen next? Would the courts step in? What is Congress’s role? As...

Science gets shut down right along with the federal government

When the U.S. government shuts down, much of the science that it supports is not spared. And there is no magic light switch that can be flipped to reverse the impact. For instance, large-scale instruments...